We’ve added another one - October Boo(k) Club Update!

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Along with picking apples from the orchard and pumpkins from the patch (I can’t help myself, it's FALL), our booksellers have picked a new round of reads for our book clubs! We’re kicking off Fall by bringing a few spooky stories into our regular rotation of book clubs, and adding a new one: GRAPHIC CONTENT - A new book club for graphic novel lovers!

 

 

 

Graphic Content is our newest reading group and exclusively for graphic novels, hosted by Jordan. The first book for this club is winner of three Eisner Awards and one of the most critically acclaimed, best-selling comic books series of the last decade, Y: The Last Man: Book One by Brian K. Vaughn with art by Pia Guerra.

Y: The Last Man is that rare example of a page-turner that is at once humorous, socially relevant and endlessly surprising. Written by Brian K. Vaughan (LOST, PRIDE OF BAGHDAD, EX MACHINA) and with art by Pia Guerra, this is the saga of Yorick Brown--the only human survivor of a planet-wide plague that instantly kills every mammal possessing a Y chromosome. Accompanied by a mysterious government agent, a brilliant young geneticist and his pet monkey, Ampersand, Yorick travels the world in search of his lost love and the answer to why he's the last man on earth.

Graphic Conent will have its first meeting on Monday, October 9th at 6:30 pm!

This month's pick for Wilde Readers, our reading group focusing on LGBTQ+ lit, is Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was by Sjon, translated by Victoria Cribb.

The mind-bending miniature historical epic is Sjon's specialty, and Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was is no exception. But it is also Sjon's most realistic, accessible, and heartfelt work yet. It is the story of a young man on the fringes of a society that is itself at the fringes of the world--at what seems like history's most tumultuous, perhaps ultimate moment.

Mani Steinn is queer in a society in which the idea of homosexuality is beyond the furthest extreme. His city, Reykjavik in 1918, is homogeneous and isolated and seems entirely defenseless against the Spanish flu, which has already torn through Europe, Asia, and North America and is now lapping up on Iceland's shores. And if the flu doesn't do it, there's always the threat that war will spread all the way north. And yet the outside world has also brought Icelanders cinema! And there's nothing like a dark, silent room with a film from Europe flickering on the screen to help you escape from the overwhelming threats--and adventures--of the night, to transport you, to make you feel like everything is going to be all right. For Mani Steinn, the question is whether, at Reykjavik's darkest hour, he should retreat all the way into this imaginary world, or if he should engage with the society that has so soundly rejected him.

Wilde Readers will meet Tuesday, October 10th at 6:30 pm.

This month the Found in Translation book club takes on a “chilling ghost story,” Such Small Hands by Andrés Barba.

Life changes at the orphanage the day seven-year-old Marina shows up. She is different from the other girls: at once an outcast and object of fascination. As Marina struggles to find her place, she invents a game whose rules are dictated by a haunting violence. Written in hypnotic, lyrical prose, alternating between Marina's perspective and the choral we of the other girls, Such Small Hands evokes the pain of loss and the hunger for acceptance.

Come chat about this chilling tale on Thursday, October 19th at 6:30 pm!

Our October short story selection for the In Brief book club is Bobcat & Other Stories by Rebecca Lee.

Rebecca Lee, one of our most gifted and original short story writers, guides readers into a range of landscapes, both foreign and domestic, crafting stories as rich as novels. A student plagiarizes a paper and holds fast to her alibi until she finds herself complicit in the resurrection of one professor's shadowy past. A dinner party becomes the occasion for the dissolution of more than one marriage. A woman is hired to find a wife for the one true soulmate she's ever found. In all, Rebecca Lee traverses the terrain of infidelity, obligation, sacrifice, jealousy, and yet finally, optimism. Showing people at their most vulnerable, Lee creates characters so wonderfully flawed, so driven by their desire, so compelled to make sense of their human condition, that it's impossible not to feel for them when their fragile belief in romantic love, domestic bliss, or academic seclusion fails to provide them with the sort of force field they'd expected.

The In Brief book club will meet Tuesday, October 24 at 6:30 pm.

Tell Me How It Ends, our reading group for nonfiction titles, is trying something new with At the Existentialist Cafe: Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails by Sarah Bakewell.

From the best-selling author of How to live, a spirited account of one of the twentieth century's major intellectual movements and the revolutionary thinkers who came to shape it Paris, 1933: three contemporaries meet over apricot cocktails at the Bec-de-Gaz bar on the rue Montparnasse. They are the young Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and longtime friend Raymond Aron, a fellow philosopher who raves to them about a new conceptual framework from Berlin called Phenomenology. 'You see,' he says, 'if you are a phenomenologist you can talk about this cocktail and make philosophy out of it!' It was this simple phrase that would ignite a movement, inspiring Sartre to integrate Phenomenology into his own French, humanistic sensibility, thereby creating an entirely new philosophical approach inspired by themes of radical freedom, authentic being, and political activism. This movement would sweep through the jazz clubs and cafâes of the Left Bank before making its way across the world as Existentialism. Featuring not only philosophers, but also playwrights, anthropologists, convicts, and revolutionaries, At the Existentialist Cafe follows the existentialists' story, from the first rebellious spark through the Second World War, to its role in postwar liberation movements such as anticolonialism, feminism, and gay rights. Interweaving biography and philosophy, it is the epic account of passionate encounters--fights, love affairs, mentorships, rebellions, and long partnerships--and a vital investigation into what the existentialists have to offer us today, at a moment when we are once again confronting the major questions of freedom, global responsibility, and human authenticity in a fractious and technology-driven world.

Tell Me How It Ends meets Monday, October 30 at 6:30 pm.

And last but not least, our monthly celebration of the weird, the Weird & Wonderful Book Club, will be talking about Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle.

Alone since four members of the family died of arsenic poisoning, Merricat, Constance and Julian Blackwood spend their days in happy isolation until cousin Charles appears. Taking readers deep into a labyrinth of dark neurosis, We Have Always Lived in the Castle is a deliciously unsettling novel about a perverse, isolated, and possibly murderous family and the struggle that ensues when a cousin arrives at their estate.

Weird & Wonderful will meet Wednesday, November 1 at 6:30 pm.

Start your fall with a new book, come check out our bOoOoOoOok clubs (I really can’t help, it, I love Halloween)! No sign up, just grab a book with our book club discount, and come chat!